Living with side effects

On this page you will find stories and advice from people living with side effects. You can filter these stories to find ones that may be more relevant to you. The 'Resources' section includes information and support from other organisations.

Treatments for prostate cancer often cause side effects. This page offers resources to help you to live with your side effects.

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Help and support signpost
test

 

    Sexual side effects

  • Sexual side effects can include:Erectile dysfunction
    • Erectile dysfunction
    • Loss of interest in sex (low libido) 
    • Problems with relationships.
  • There are many treatment options available. You can speak to your doctor or nurse specialist. 
  • They can help you to decide which treatment is best for you. 
  • They may also be able to refer you to a sex therapist or counsellor.

    Our services search tool (link will open in a new tab) will allow you to search for hospitals near you that offer a sexual function service. 
     

Some of the resources in the following list may require payment.

 

Prostate Cancer Research and Tackle Prostate Cancer

  • In 2021 Prostate Cancer Research worked with Tackle Prostate Cancer to produce a series of webinars. These looked at how you can live well with your prostate cancer. This series included videos on sex and intimacy (link opens in new external tab).

 

Movember True North

  • Movember is a global men's health charity. They fund a programme called True North which supports people through their prostate cancer journey. 
  • They have a section on sex and intimacy after prostate cancer. This covers subjects such as: 
    • erectile dysfunction
    • marriage and relationships
    • emotional and mental health
    • low sex drive
    • dry orgasms. 
  • Find out more by visiting the True North-Movember website (link opens in new external tab). 

 

Sex with Cancer

  • Sex with Cancer is an online shop, an artwork and a public campaign exploring how people living with and beyond cancer can take control over their own health and wellbeing. Visit the Sex with Cancer website (link opens in new external tab).

 

A Touchy Subject

  •  A Touchy Subject is run by Victoria Cullen a sexuality educator. She has:
  • There are lots of free-to-access videos about living with erectile dysfunction after treatment for prostate cancer. There is also a free online rehabilitation course. 

 

Cancer Research UK

 

Prostate Cancer UK

  • Prostate Cancer UK have a page on sex and relationships (link opens in new external tab).
  • Prostate Cancer UK also run a sexual support service. You can talk to one of their specialist nurses about the impact of treatment on your sexuality and relationships. 
  • They can discuss possible treatments or ways to deal with the changes. 
  • To sign up for the service, contact their specialist nurses on 0800 074 8383. 
  • You can also fill in a form on their website (link opens in new external tab). One of their specialist nurses will assess whether or not the service will suit your needs. 

 

Macmillan Cancer Support

  • Macmillan Cancer Support have information about how cancer can affect your sex life (link opens in new external tab). This includes practical tips on how to manage some of the more common problems.

 

Relate

  • Relate have a network of Relate Centres across the UK (link opens in new external tab) and a group of licensed local counsellors that provide face-to-face counselling and support. 
  • They also provide phone, email and live chat (link opens in new external tab) counselling so you can choose the support that works for you. 
  • They also offer sex therapy (link opens in new external tab).

 

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Orchid

 

College of Sexual and Relationship Therapists (COSRT)

  • COSRT is the UK’s only professional body dedicated to psychosexual and relationship therapies. 
  • They have a page of information and downloadable fact sheets (link opens in new external tab) on subjects such as:
    • Cancer sex and relationships
    • Common sexual problems
    • Therapy approaches
    • Psychotherapy and counseling.
  • They also have a ‘find a therapist’ section, (link opens in new external tab) where you can look for a therapist in your area. 

The Institute of Psychosexual Medicine

  • The Institute of Psychosexual Medicine (IPM) trains doctors and related health professional who see patients with psychosexual issues. 
  • They deal with problems such as:
    • Erectile dysfunction
    • Loss of interest in sex
    • Difficulty with orgasm 
  • You can find an IPM specialist near you by vising their website.

Cancer Council NSW

  • Cancer Council NSW is an Australian cancer charity. They have lots of information about sexuality, intimacy and cancer (link opens in new external tab). This includes information on: 

    • Treatment side effects and sex
    • Sex after diagnosis.

    They also provide information for partners. 

  • They have a set of questions that you can ask your doctor. As well as online information, they have a downloadable booklet and a podcast. 
Psychological side effects

 

 

    Psychological and emotional side effects

You may be able to access psychological counselling on the NHS. Speak to your consultant or specialist nurse. 

Our services search tool (link will open in a new tab) will allow you to search for hospitals near you that offer a psychological counselling service. 
 
 

 

Look Good Feel Better

  • Look Good Feel Better is a national cancer charity. They run free workshops both online and at cancer care centres across the UK to support people with cancer. They have a page called Look Good Feel Better for Men (link opens in new external tab). This includes information on:Black man doing stretches outside
    • Skincare and grooming
    • Pilates
    • Chair Tai Chi and Qigong workshops
    • Meditation and breathwork workshops
    • Chair yoga.

 

  • They also produce a ‘manual for men’, which includes information to help manage some of the side effects of cancer treatment. 

 

Penny Brohn UK

  • Penny Brohn UK (link opens in new external tab) is a UK based health and wellbeing charity that provides cancer care for:
    • Your mind
    • Body
    • Emotions
    • Heart
    • Soul
  • Their services are open to anyone aged 18 and over who has a cancer diagnosis, and to people in a close supporting role. Services can be accessed online and at their centre in Bristol. They also run online group sessions. 

     

Maggie’s

  • Maggie’s (link opens in new external tab) offer free support to anyone with cancer and their families. You can access face-to-face support at one of their centres (link opens in new external tab) or online.

     

Macmillan Cancer Support

  • Macmillan Cancer Support (link opens in new external tab) offer help with dealing with your emotions. 
  • You can call the Macmillan support line on: 0808 808 0000. This is open from 8am to 8pm, seven days a week. 
  • Free specialist counselling: Through Bupa, Macmillan are offering up to six free counselling sessions for people struggling emotionally because they are living with cancer. People can access specialist support remotely within days if they qualify to use the service. To find out more, visit Macmillan's free specialist counselling page (this link will open in a new window) or call their free support line on: 0808 808 0000 and ask about the Bupa service. 

 

Cancer Research UK

  • Cancer Research UK have a page dedicated to mental health and cancer. This includes sections on:
    • Mental health during and after cancer treatment
    • Mental health when caring for someone with cancer
    • How cancer can make you feel
    • Talking to children about cancer.

       

  • Visit the page on the Cancer Research UK website (link opens in new external tab).

 

Orchid – Fighting Male Cancer

  • Orchid is a charity for those affected by male cancer. 
  • They offer a free national male cancer helpline. This is a service for anyone who has been affected by prostate, penile or testicular cancer.
  • You can speak to one of their nurses to get information and support. The helpline is available Monday, Wednesday and Fridays from 9am to 5.30pm. 
  • You can email them at helpline@orchid-cancer.org.uk.
  • For more information about their work and how they can support, visit the Orchid website (link opens in new external tab). 

 

 

Cancer Support UK

  • Cancer Support UK provides practical and emotional support to people living with cancer, both during and after the treatment period. They help people with all kinds of cancer across the UK. Visit the Cancer Support UK website (link opens in new external tab) for more information.

 

Prostate Cancer UK

  • Prostate Cancer UK have a downloadable emotional support handbook. It covers subjects such as:
    • Managing low mood and feelings of hopelessness
    • Managing anxiety
    • Managing life-changing events
    • Maintaining good mental health.

       

  • Download or read the booklet on the Prostate Cancer UK website (link opens in new external tab). 

     

Mind

  • Mind support people with mental health problems including anxiety, depression and stress. They have an infoline that provides an information and signposting service. This is open 9am to 6pm, Monday to Friday. You can ask about:

     

    • Mental health problems
    • Where to get help near you
    • Treatment options
    • Advocacy services.

       

  • The infoline number is: 0300 123 3393
  • There is also a chat service on the website. 
  • You can search for your local Mind service by using their online search tool (link opens in new external tab). 
  • For more information, visit the MIND website (link opens in new external tab). 

 

The British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP)

  • The British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy is the professional association for members of the counselling professions in the UK.  

     

  • They have a page on their website that is dedicated to cancer. This talks about how counselling can help people cope better with their cancer journey. They provide a search tool that will help you find a counsellor in your local area.  Visit the dedicated cancer page on the BACP website (link opens in new external tab). Services of a counsellor will require payment. 

 

 

Support for Black and minority ethnic people 

Can-Survive UK 

  • Provides culturally sensitive support and information for people with cancer, their families and carers. They are based in Manchester. They offer a range of different services tailored to the needs of diverse communities, including: 
    • Support groups, e.g. MOT (Men Only Thursdays)
    • One-to-one services, e.g. counselling and life-coaching, advice and information
    • Group activities such as, meditation, art and talking therapy
    • Structures workshops such as, healthy diet and cooking, coping with anxiety and stress. 
    • Home visiting service.
  • You can find out more by visiting the Can-Survive UK website (link opens in new external tab).

 

The Black, African and Asian Therapy Network

  • The Black, African and Asian Therapy Network is the home of the largest community of counsellors and psychotherapists of Black, African, Asian and Caribbean heritage in the UK. You can search for a counsellor using their directory (link opens in new external tab). These services will require payment. 
  • They also provide information on:
physical side effects

 

 

    Physical side effects

Man sat in bed worrying about peeing

Your local hospital may offer a specialist continence service. Talk to your consultant or specialist nurse.

Our services search tool (link will opne in a new tab) will allow you to search for hospitals near you that offer a specialist continence service. 
 

Prostate Cancer UK 

  • Prostate Cancer UK produce a number of ‘how to manage’ guides (link opens in new external tab). These include information on:
    • Fatigue
    • Problems with peeing (urinary problems)
    • Symptoms and side effects of advanced prostate cancer.
  • You can also contact one of Prostate Cancer UK‘s specialist nurses for support. They are available Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm. The number is 0800 074 8383. 

 

Cancer Research UK 

(All links open in new external tabs).

 

The Bladder and Bowel Community

  • The Bladder and Bowel Community (link opens in new external tab) is the UK-wide service for people with bladder- and bowel- control conditions.  
  • They provide information and support services, including a managed online support group, for anyone affected by these conditions. There is also information for families, carers and healthcare professionals. 
  • They can provide you with a physical or digital  ‘Just can’t wait’ (link opens in new external tab) toilet card.

 

Bladder and Bowel UK

  • Bladder and Bowel UK are part of an organisation called Disabled Living. Disabled Living is a registered charity which was established in 1897. They provide impartial information and advice about equipment and services for disabled individuals, their families and carers. Visit the Disabled LIving website (link opens in a new external tab) for more information.
  • Bladder and Bowel UK work to improve awareness and find solutions to bladder and bowel problems. 
  • They have a helpline where you can receive advice on bladder and bowel health, continence promotion and options for managing incontinence, products, as well as signposting to services. 
  • You can contact the helpline team by completing the form on the Bladder and Bowel UK website (link opens in a new external tab). If you are not able to complete the form, you can call the helpline on 0161 214 4591. Calling their number will cost the standard rate. 
  • They also have a shop supplying continence and mobility products. This is run in partnership with with Countrywide Health & Mobility. 
  • Visit the Bladder and Bowel UK website (link opens in a new external tab) for more information.

 

Continence Product Advisor

  • The Continence Product Advisor is a collaboration between the International Consultation on Incontinence (ICI), the International Continence Society (ICS), University of Southampton and University College London. 
  • The Continence Product Advisor website is designed to give users, carers and healthcare professionals detailed, essential information about products for:
    • Bladder
    • Bowel
    • toileting problems. 
  • It is hosted and maintained by the International Continence Society.
  • the Continence Product Advisor provides information which is:
    • Evidence-based – including the product advisor, shown to improve confidence in product selection 
    • Independent – without industry sponsorship or brand promotion 
    • Comprehensive – a one-stop information resource covering all key product designs 
    • Not for profit and freely available – with downloadable resources 
  • Find out more by visiting the Continence Product Advisor website (link will open in a new tab).

 

Macmillan Cancer Support

  • Macmillan Cancer Support have a very detailed page on living with the side effects from chemotherapy. This includes:
    • Your bone marrow and blood
    • The digestive system – feeling sick
    • Skin and hair changes
    • Feeling tired
    • Risk of infections.
  • Visit their chemotherapy page (link opens in new external tab).
  • Macmillan also have palliative care nurses. Palliative care nurses can help you to manage the symptoms of advanced cancer and the side effects from cancer treatments. 
  • They can answer questions about managing pain, sickness or breathlessness. 
  • They can also give emotional support and practical advice to you and those around you. 
  • You can be referred to a palliative care nurse at any stage of your cancer journey. You will need to be referred by a healthcare professional. This can be your GP, your cancer doctor or nurse or a community nurse. 
  • RESTORE is an online tool developed by Macmillan and The University of Southampton. It provides information about how you can manage cancer-related fatigue. It provides information about things you can do to help you cope with fatigue. You will need to register to access the RESTORE tool.

 

NHS University Hospitals Plymouth

  • NHS University Hospitals Plymouth have made a video called ‘Living on hormones - managing side effects with exercise’ (link opens in new external tab). The video is about three minutes long.  This talks about the benefits of exercise in managing fatigue and hot flushes. 

     

  • They have also put together a 21-minute exercise video (link opens in new external tab). The exercises have been designed for men who have little or no experience of exercise. They can be done standing or sitting down. Always speak to your healthcare team before doing any exercises. 

 

 

Orchid – Fighting Male Cancer

  • Orchid is a charity for those affected by male cancer. 
  • They have a free, national male cancer helpline. This is available Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 9am to 5.30pm. You can speak to one of their nurses for information and support. The helpline number is 0808 802 0010. 
  • Visit their ‘ask the experts’ page for information on diet and exercise (link opens in new external tab). 
  • For more information about Orchid and what they do, visit the Orchid website (link opens in new external tab). 

 

Cancer Council NSW

  • Cancer Council NSW is an Australian cancer charity. They have lots of information about managing cancer side effects (link opens in new external tab). This includes:
    • Fatigue
    • Taste and smell changes
    • Pain
    • Nutrition
    • Changing in thinking and memory.
  • They also offer:
    • A set of questions that you can ask your doctor 
    • Downloadable booklets and podcasts about each topic. 

 

hormone therapy

 

 

    Free online androgen deprivation (hormone therapy) educational programme

  • This is a free online educational programme to help patients manage hormone therapy side effects. It is run by the European Association of Urology. 
  • The class is hosted by the following institutions: 
    • University Hospital Southampton
    • The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral
    • Guy’s Hospital, London
    • St James Hospital, Dublin Ireland
    • Prostate Cancer UK.
  • More information can be found on the Life on Androgen Deprivation Therapy website (link will open in a new external tab).
  • You can register for free online.
  • UK registration page (this link will open in a new external tab).

 

Living with side effects poster
relationships

 

 

   Support groups and forums

  • You may find it helpful to speak to other people who have prostate cancer. Joining a support group can give you the chance to hear experiences from other people who have been or are going through the same journey as you.

General support groups

Tackle Prostate Cancer

  • Tackle Prostate Cancer (link opens in a new external tab) are the only UK-wide charity representing people with prostate cancer and those who care for them. 
  • They run a helpline (link opens in a new external tab)which is staffed by volunteers who are living with or have been affected by prostate cancer. It is open every day of the year from 9am to 9pm. You can contact them on: 0800 035 5302.
  • They also support patient groups around the UK. You can search for your nearest support group on their support group page (link opens in a new external tab).

 

Support for Black and minority ethnic people with cancer 

Can-Survive UK 

  • Provides culturally sensitive support and information for people with cancer, their families and carers. They are based in Manchester. They offer a range of different services tailored to the needs of diverse communities, including: 
    • Support groups, e.g. MOT (Men Only Thursdays)
    • One-to-one services, e.g. counselling and life-coaching, advice and information
    • Group activities such as, meditation, art and talking therapy
    • Structures workshops such as, healthy diet and cooking, coping with anxiety and stress. 
    • Home visiting service.
  • You can find out more by visiting the Can-Survive UK website (link opens in a new external tab).

 

‘Check it out’ Prostate Cancer Support Group for African & African Caribbean Men

  • Meetings usually take place every three months - but are currently postponed.
  • Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, M13 9WL
  • Contact Laura Robinson
  • Email: laura.robinson@mft.nhs.uk
  • Phone: 0161 276 3641
     

Orchid – Fighting Male Cancer

 

B’Me Against Cancer

  • B’Me aim to preserve and protect the health of all people.  In particular but not exclusively they focus on:
    • People from Black and minority ethnic (BME)
    • Low-income communities living with or affected by cancer. 

They provide:

  • Culturally sensitive and appropriate practical advice, information, advocacy and support services
  • Services directed to improving participation in BME cancer research.
  • Visit the B’Me Against Cancer website for more information. This link will open in a new external tab. 
  • They are based in Nottingham.
  • Phone: 0115 845 6432 
  • Email: service@bmecancer.com

 

FAB - Friends and Bredrins

  • FAB are an independent, Nottingham based prostate cancer and self-help charity.
  • FAB welcomes Black and White members.
  • They aim to riase prostate cancer awareness and support predominantly (but not exclusively) African heritateg men and their families affected by prostate cancer. 
  • FAB support group meetings are are held every 2nd Wednesday of each month. 
  • Members are very welcome to attend in person or attend virtually by video conferencing (Zoom). Sign up to attend by contacting FAB’s Secretary.
  • The meeting venue: GMB offices, 542 Woodborough Road, Nottingham, NG3 5FJ. 
  • If you would like to join their cancer group, please contact them:

    By phone +44 (0)77 112 02298 / +44 (0)78 175 22100 or via their contact page:

    Visit the FAB website for more information.

 

Black Health Initiative

  • BHI is a community, engagement organisation working towards equality of access to health and social care within Leeds and the surrounding areas for disadvantaged communities. 
  • Visit the BHI website for more information. (this link will open in a new external tab). 
  • Phone: 0113 307 0300
  • Email: admin@bhileeds.org.uk

 

1 in 4 Sheffield Prostate Cancer Support Group

  • The Sheffield Prostate Cancer Support Group was established in 2022, with the knowldedge that, 1 in 4 men of Black, African or Caribbean heritage will get prostate cancer in their lifetime. 
  • The support group extends to anyone with experience of prostate cancer. It is primarily for Black men and their families. 
  • The aim is to support men from diagnosis to ensure they are well infomed when making treatment decisions, whilst providing a human connection to help people deal with any concerns. 
  • The 1 in 4 support group plan to meet on the 1st Tuesday in each month at the SACMHA, Breinburg Court, 263 Pitsmoor Road, Sheffield S3 9AQ. 
  • For more details you can visit the 1 in 4 Sheffield Prostate Cancer Support Group website.

 

The Errol McKellar Foundation

  • The Errol McKellar Foundation (link will open in a new tab) is a charitable project founded by 60 year old football coach, former garage owner and prostate cancer survivor, Errol McKellar.
  • The Errol McKellar Foundation focuses on giving presentations and talks around the UK to raise the awareness of important men’s health issues, especially prostate cancer.
  • Visit the event page (link will open in a new tab) to find out about upcoming events and 'sit and talk' groups. 

 

Cancer don't let it win CIC

  • Cancer don't let it win (link will open in a new tab) is a non-profit support group raising the awareness of prostate cancer within Black communities. 
  • They run monthly support groups that are open to all individuals and families affected by prostate cancer.
  • Meetings take place on the 2nd Wednesday of the month from 2pm to 4pm at the Glass Mill Leisure Centre, 41 Loampit Vale, SE13 7FT. Other locations are sometimes used. Check their support group page for more information. 
  • Contact: 07538798819 or email: info@cancerdontletitwincic.com 

 

Brother to Brother, Man to Man

 

Support for members of the LGBTQ community with prostate cancer

LBGT Walnut

  • LGBT Walnut (link will open in a new external tab) is an independent support group for any LGBTQ person affected by prostate cancer.
  • They usually hold monthly meetings on the first Saturday of the month, online, and on the third Saturday of the month, face to face. Find more about the meetings on the LGBT Walnut webpage (this link will open in a new external tab). 
  • LGBT Walnut mainly covers the Greater London area and parts of south-east England but welcome people wherever they are based. 

 

Out with Prostate Cancer

  • Out with Prostate Cancer offers mutual support, shared experience and practical information to those who have prostate cancer.
  • The group is directed mainly at gay and bisexual men and trans women.
  • The group meets on the first Saturday of every month between 2pm and 4pm. These are hybrid meetings, in-person in the centre of Manchester and at the same time on Zoom. 
  • To find out more, visit the Out with Prostate Cancer website (link will open in a new external tab). 

 

Cancer support for the Muslim community

  • Safeena Muslim Cancer Support Network (link will open in a new tab) provide practical, educational, emotional support, and in particular, Islamic guidance for Muslims affected by cancer. 
  • They have an online community forum (link opens in a new tab) where you can submit a new topic or browse existing topics. 
living well with prostate cancer

 

 

    Living well with prostate cancer webinars

LIving well with prostate cancer

 

Living Well with Prostate Cancer

  • In 2021 Prostate Cancer Research worked with Tackle Prostate Cancer to produce a series of webinars. These looked at how you can live well with your prostate cancer. The webinars can be found on the Prostate Cancer Research website (this link will open in a new external tab). 
    • A Whole Life Approach – resilience, wellbeing and self-care, physical activity
    • Nutrition and Prostate Cancer
    • The NHS and Your Care
    • The Future of Treatment
    • Looking and Feeling Great – body confidence workshop, skin fitness workshop
    • Sex and Intimacy.
podcasts

 

 

    Podcasts about living with cancer

Move Against Cancer Podcast

  • Move Against Cancer Podcast. These podcasts aim to support and inspire people to move, exercise and live a full and active life despite a cancer diagnosis. They also share the stories of ordinary people doing extraordinary things. 

The Christie NHS Foundation Trust

  • The Christie NHS Foundation Trust podcasts provide help and advice for living with and beyond cancer. They include topics such as:
    • Exercise
    • Dealing with fatigue
    • Pins and needles
    • Eating and appetite and losing weight
    • Managing worry
    • Dealing with pain.

 

Penny Brohn

  • Penny Brohn is a UK based health and wellbeing charity that provides cancer care for:
    • Your mind
    • Body
    • Emotions
    • Heart
    • Soul.
  • They have brought together a selection of podcasts about cancer. This list can be found on the Penny Brohn website (this link will open in a new external tab). 
apps

 

 

    Apps to help you manage your cancer journey

Prostate Scotland Cancer Navigator App

  • Prostate Scotland worked closely with patients and their families, clinicians and experts to develop and test the app.
  • Features include:
    • Treatment decision making tool.
    • PSA test results tracker.
    • A monitor to record any side effects of treatment.
    • Practical information and support resources.
    • A facility for keeping details of appointments, tests and results.
    • An 'electronic pill box' - for keeping track of your medications.
    • A facility to record consultations with clinicians (permission must be obtained from the clinician).
  • The app once downloaded and a personal password set up, is encrypted and personal to the individual. The data is not stored remotely and remains on the person's device.
  • The information in the app has been developed basd on the position in Scotland and therefore content may not be relevant for men and their families living in other countries. 
  • You can download the app on GooglePlay or on Apple's app store

     

Careology

  • Careology provide a free app to help you manage your cancer journey. You can monitor your symptoms, manage your medication, monitor appointments and keep a journal. To find out more and access the app, visit the Careology website (this link will open in a new external tab). 

 

Owise

  • Owise have produced an app for people with prostate cancer that can help you to:
    • Monitor your side effects
    • Manage appointments
    • Record audio
    • Access a list of personalised suggested questions and 
    • Look up medical terms.
  • For more information and to download the app, you can visit the Owise website. You can also watch the ‘getting to know the Owise prostate cancer app’ video (this link will open in a new external tab). 
Icon of person with a dark cloud inside their head

 

 

   Information about finances

What financial support is available to me?

  • Money may be a problem if you are no longer able to work. You may be entitled to a social worker. You can ask:
    • Your GP
    • Local authority (adult social care department) or
    • Hospital team,  if you are eligible.
    • A social worker will be able to look at your financial situation. They can then give you advice on benefits or special funds that you may be entitled to. 

       

  • Macmillan Cancer Support have information on benefits for people who are affected by cancer (links will open in new tabs). 
    • Their advisors can offer financial guidance, energy advice and advice about welfare rights. You can call the Macmillan support line on: 0808 808 0000. 
    • The Macmillan support line is open from 8am to 8pm,  seven days a week. But, financial guidance is only available Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm. For more information about their opening times, visit the Macmillan Cancer Support website (link will open in a new tab). 
    • Visit their money hub. This explains the latest government guidance and helps you to feel more in control. You just need to answer a few questions to get your advice checklist.

 

  • Maggie’s can provide support if you have money worries. You can get individual advice from one of their benefits advisors by visiting your nearest Maggie’s centre. Visit their money and benefits webpage for more information on what they can offer, and to find you nearest centre. 

     

  • Cancer Research UK have a page on financial support and cancer (link will open in a new tab). This includes information about benefits, charity grants and useful contacts.  They also have a dedicated page for ex services veterans (link will open in a new tab). 

 

 

  • The Gov.uk website (this link will open in an external tab) provides information on benefits at the end of life including non-means-tested disability living allowance.

    They also have a 'check benefits and financial support you can get' tool (link opens in new tab). 

     

  • Turn 2 Us (link opens in a new tab) is a national charity offering information and practical help to people facing financial insecurity. Visit their website to learn more about specific benefits and other types of support. 

     

  • Citizens Advice (link opens in a new tab) can offer help and support around benefits, debt and money issues plus much more. 

 

  • Age UK offer advice and support on a wide range of topics such as:

    • Benefits and entitlements
    • Debt and savings
    • Pensions
    • Health services
    • NHS continuing healthcare payments.

    Visit their information and advice hub (link will open in a new tab) for more information. 

About this information

  • This information was published in March 2023. We will revise it in March 2024.
  • References and bibliography available on request.
  • If you want to reproduce this content, please see our Reproducing Our Content page.

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